ZENNNOSE.jpg
IMG_4520.jpg
SpicyBlackfix.jpg
ZENNNOSE.jpg

WELCOME!


SCROLL DOWN

WELCOME!


HAKATA TONKOTSU RAMEN

Tonkotsu (豚骨, "pork bone"; not to be confused with tonkatsu) ramen usually has a cloudy white colored broth. It is similar to the Chinese baitang (白湯) and has a thick broth made from boiling pork bones, fat, and collagen over high heat for many hours, which suffuses the broth with a hearty pork flavor and a creamy consistency that rivals milk, melted butter or gravy (depending on the shop). Most shops, but not all, blend this pork broth with a small amount of chicken and vegetable stock and/or soy sauce. The noodles are thin and straight, and it is often served with beni shoga (pickled ginger). In recent years the latest trend in tonkotsu toppings is māyu (sesame oil), a blackish, aromatic oil made from either charred crushed garlic or Sesame seeds. It is a specialty of Kyushu, particularly Hakata-ku, Fukuoka (hence sometimes called "Hakata ramen").

HIDETO KAWAHARA

HIDETO KAWAHARA is the founder of "HIDE-CHAN RAMEN" in Japan. His father owns "DARUMA RAMEN" in Hakata-ku, Fukuoka which opened over 50 years ago. In 1993, following in his fathers footsteps, HIDETO opened his own ramen house in Hakata, the original HIDE-CHAN RAMEN.

HIDE-CHAN'S Tonkotsu Ramen is a rich creamy pork bone soup with thin long noodles. He managed to create a original ramen that made him a pioneer in the ramen world while holding on to traditional and authentic ramen to his recipes. In 2002, the first HIDE-CHAN RAMEN outside of Hakata was opened in Akasaka, Tokyo. Which had great success and led to the opening of 13 more stores throughout Japan. SEE THE HIDE-CHAN RAMEN JAPAN WEBSITE 

We would like to make HAKATA RAMEN recognized throughout the world and give you an experience of "HAKATA CULTURE". We are pleased to serve you delicious ramen and make you happy in unique HIDE-CHAN way.

IMG_4520.jpg

eat with us!


SCROLL DOWN

eat with us!


Hakata or Nagahama, ramen from Fukuoka features a soup made primarily with pork bones, which are cooked for a long time over extremely high heat. Such a method of cooking releases the bone marrow into the broth and gives the soup its characteristic richness. Flavors vary depending on cooking time and exactly which pieces of bone are used. Savory shoyu tare, or soy sauce soup base, is typically not added, although there are notable exceptions at shops which serve a soup pale brown in color. Often the tare is placed tableside for diners to season thheir broth to taste.

Noodles are distinct - firm in texture and ultra thin, straight and white in appearance. They are boiled very quickly. They are unrisen, made with a very low amount of sodium bicarbonate water. 

Dashi is a Japanese stock or broth, and it is a fundamental ingredient in many Japanese dishes. Dashi is made from kombu (dried kelp), bonito flakes (dried and smoked skipjack tuna that is shaved into thin flakes), anchovies/sardine (iriko or niboshi), or a combination of all or two of them. All the dried foods used to make stocks are rich in naturally occurring glutamates and provide intense flavor to the stock. Dashi creates a savoy umami flavor from all these ingredients and you don't need to season the food much if you have good dashi.

Red dragon is a bonito, kombu, dried shiitake mushroom based broth. The red color comes from hours of cooking chili peppers with the broth which gives it an umami filled addicting spicy flavor. Approximately 5 cloves of garlic is included in each bowl of ramen but because it is slow cooked, the smell and flavor are subtle. Chives are also used plentiful in the soup giving it another subtle but crucial flavor. 

The red dragon is considered a healthy ramen option low in calories, raises metabolism by warming the body from the inside out. If you see someone excessively sweating in our store, you can bet they're enjoying the Red Dragon.

SpicyBlackfix.jpg

PRESS


SCROLL DOWN

PRESS


JAPAN is dotted with wonderfully workaday ramen shops, places that are especially compelling when the weather turns cold. The lunch crowd squeezes into a narrow space shrouded in steam pouring from soup bowls, stock brews on open flames beyond the counter, and beside... read more

Hideto Kawahara, a ramen chef based in the Hakata region of Fukuoka, Japan, oversees the steaming bowls at this midtown noodle shop. At Hide-Chan, Kawahara focuses on tonkotsu (pork) broth—a luscious, meaty soup, more cloudy than creamy. The best way to... read more

There is a meticulous science and culture to this ramen-ya that has seemingly perfected the customized noodle experience. Two suggestions to novices: dine during off-hours to avoid their mile-long line; and ponder exactly how firm you like your ramen cooked... read more

The sound of diners "noisily slurping" "cooked-to-perfection" noodles swimming in "flavorful" broth provides the background music at this "authentic" East Midtown Japanese ramen joint; alright, the service... read more